Couple Makes $80,000 Gift to OPHS

Couple Makes Gift to OPHS in Honor of “Titus” 

Port Angeles, WA ( January 19, 2015) —  The Olympic Peninsula Humane Society has received a gift of annuities totaling approximately $80,000 from an anonymous donor for the shelter’s Dig Deep capital campaign.

The gift was made in honor of the couple’s grand dog, “Titus.” Titus is a Great Pyrenees mix and is a rescue dog adopted by the couple’s daughter. Titus will be appropriately recognized in the new dog kennel building once it is complete.

This gift brings the total funds raised for Dig Deep to $1.13 million. OPHS is still working to raise an additional $300,000 for the project.

The funds will be used to help complete construction of the dog kennel building at the Humane Society’s new site on Old Olympic Highway. Hoch Construction is the general contractor of the project, Lindberg and Smith Architects is the architect and project manager. The goal is for OPHS to move to the new site by the fall of 2015.

If you have questions about the Humane Society’s planned giving program, please call the shelter at (360) 457-8206.

The Olympic Peninsula Humane Society has maintained an active presence in the community since 1947. The Society shelters and cares for animals of all types.  A private, non-profit  corporation, the Society is financed primarily by private donations and gifts. No animals are turned away and annually approximately 2,000 animals pass through the doors of the facility. For more information or to volunteer, please call the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society at 360-457-8206.

 

 

OPHS Names General Contractor for Building Project

Port Angeles, WA (November 24, 2014) The Olympic Peninsula Humane Society has named Hoch Construction of Port Angeles as the General Contractor for the shelter’s new dog kennel building to be constructed at 1743 Old Olympic Highway.

Work has already begun at the property thanks to a donation by Green Crow which completed all of the preliminary site work needed to begin construction. Continue reading

OPHS Proposes Bylaw Change

The following proposal will be voted on at a special members’ meeting on Thursday, September 25, 2014. The meeting will take place at noon in the Carver Room of the Port Angeles Library.

PROPOSAL: Change OPHS from “Member-Based” to “Donor-Based”                                        Organization

  Rationale:

  In order to streamline the operation of the OPHS Board (in keeping with most animal welfare organizations and other non-profits), OPHS would  no longer have members (voting or otherwise).

  At the suggestion of the Executive Director, making OPHS a donor-based organization will relieve the staff and Board of a great deal of extra work required to maintain “membership” records, levels of contributions, notification of meetings etc. This extra work costs time and money which can be better spent on animal welfare.

  Very few members actually attend the regular or annual meetings and it is felt most people who become “members” think of their dues as a donation rather than as prerequisite to involvement in the workings of the organization.

  Further, eliminating membership in OPHS will also afford the Board the opportunity to bring on qualified new Board members throughout the year instead of just once a year at the Annual meeting. This capability  will help maintain the continuity of a strong and viable Board by staggering terms of service.

  As a public entity, regular meetings of the Board are always and will continue to be open to the public.All meeting notices will be posted on the OPHS website and on the OPHS Facebook page. 

**In the sections below, words appearing in RED indicate wording to be removed or changed. Words appearing in GREEN indicate possible revised wording to be voted upon. 

PROPOSED CHANGE – OMIT ARTICLE 4

Olympic Peninsula Humane Society Bylaws

(Ratified by Membership September 27, 2010) 

(Current) 

ARTICLE 4

Members

Section 4.1. Admission to membership:Terms of admission to paid membership and s categories of membership shall be as follows:

a.Officers and Directors: Officers and Directors shall be deemed members by virtue of such offices. Each Officer and Director shall have one vote.

I. Society Membership Categories:

  1. Junior (under 18, non-voting)

Children upon reaching the age of 18 years are no longer eligible for inclusion on a “family membership”.  Upon reaching the age of 18 years, they will be eligible for membership under the same terms and conditions as any other applicant.

  1. Senior (62+, 1 vote)
  2. Individual (1 vote)
  3. Couples/Family (maximum 2 votes)
  4. Business/Organization (1 vote)
  5. Life Membership -2 categories

       a)      Individuals (1 vote)

       b)      Couples     (2 votes) 

c. Honorary Members: Honorary members may be elected by the Board under such policies as the Board may establish. Each honorary member shall have one vote. Honorary membership shall be granted for eminent service and requires a unanimous vote of the Board of Directors. Payment of dues shall be waived.

d.Humane Society Employees: All full time employees shall be granted membership during employment and until termination of employment.  Employee members shall not be required to pay dues. Each full time employee shall have one vote.

e.Annual Dues: A resolution of the Board shall specify the annual dues, where appropriate, for each category of membership. Members shall pay dues in an amount set for each membership category by the Board of Directors.  A membership application form shall be made available. Membership dues may be prorated. Membership dues are not refundable.

f. Term of Memberships: Memberships shall be for the current calendar year and shall be renewable annually thereafter. Memberships shall be from January 1 through December 31.

g. Payment of Memorials or Unspecified monies: For purposes of membership, memorials shall not constitute the payment of dues.  Unspecified monies shall be accepted as donations only.

h. Delinquent Dues: Renewal dues are considered delinquent after 60 days following the start of the calendar year. After 60 days, membership will be forfeited until payment is received.  Membership will be re-instated on the date payment is received.

i. Membership Rights: Membership rights include, but are not limited, to the following: All members shall have the right to attend Board meetings, provide input on issues affecting the Society, serve on committees established by the Board, and otherwise, in a manner determined by the Board, provide support for Society programs and activities.  Members shall not be involved in the day-to-day management or affairs of the Society except in an advisory capacity as set forth herein. 

Section4.2. Appeals regarding denial and/or forfeiture of membership: Any person refused membership or suspended from membership in the Society may appeal such rejection or suspension to the Board of Directors.  Such notice of appeal must reach the Society Secretary at least twenty days before the regularly scheduled Board meeting.  The Board shall decide the issue as provided under the current version of Robert’s Rules of Order.  The decision of the Board of Directors shall be final. 

Section 4.3. Members access to Society records: Members are entitled to have reasonable access to information concerning the deliberations of the Board of Directors in order to determine whether the Society is being properly administered. Minutes of Executive and Small Board meetings are confidential and shall not be released without a 2/3 (twothirds) majority vote of the Board.  Cost of inspecting or copying shall be borne by such member except the costs for copies of the Articles of Incorporation or Bylaws.  Any such member must have a purpose for inspection reasonably related to membership interests.  Use and/or copying of the membership list, volunteer list or donor list for any purpose other than Society business is prohibited. The sale to or sharing of the membership list, volunteer list or donor list with other organizations is prohibited. Any member found by the Board of Directors to have used or contributed to the use of the membership lists, volunteer list or donor list for any purposes other than Society related business shall be suspended from membership for one year. 

 (Proposed) Entire Article removed as there will no longer be any “Members” 

If passed, all references to members throughout the remaining document will be removed and the document updated to make it grammatically correct.

Olympic Corrections Center Prisoners Help Socialize Dogs

Click here to zoom...

Olympic Peninsula Humane Society and Olympic Corrections Center have teamed up for a program that employs offenders in helping dogs become more adoptable. In the back row, from left, are Kaci Price, assistant dog program coordinator for Olympic Corrections Center; Mary Beth Wegner, executive director Olympic Peninsula Humane Society; Carol Hanson, dog program administrative assistant for OCC; and Jason Bennett, correctional program manager for OCC. In the front row, from left, are Travis Jackson with Copper, Chris Hansford with Buddy, Taylor Marean with Markswell and Travis Boyer with Truman.

 

By Zorina Barker
for Peninsula Daily News


FORKS — Though guilty of nothing, Cloudy found himself in prison south of Forks. He was a pit bull mix taken to the animal shelter in Port Angeles when he was a pup of 6 months. At over a year old, he was still awaiting a home, so he was shipped off to prison.

Since 2010, the Olympic Corrections Center and the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society have worked together to make dogs coming to the shelter more adoptable.
The “dog program” began with a forceful push from Tracy Hixon, corrections officer, now retired.

The program enlists the assistance of offenders who give shelter dogs training to make them more appealing to prospective owners. Canines leave the shelter for a term of six to eight weeks at the prison. During that time, dogs are taught what is expected of them when living in a human environment.

Carol Hanson and Kaci Price of OCC drive to the Port Angeles shelter to choose dogs from nominations from the shelter staff.

The prison cannot take aggressive dogs since the facility is responsible for the safety of both the offenders living there and the staff working on site.

“Aggressive dogs will leave that very day,” said Jason Bennett, correctional program manager of OCC.

At the prison, dogs are introduced to a pair of offenders who are roommates as well as handlers. In the care of these two men, the dogs learn commands per the guidelines set forth by the American Kennel Club’s Good Citizenship Program, though OCC is not affiliated with the club.

“Walking on a leash is vital and cannot be overemphasized,” explained Mary Beth Wegner, executive director of the Humane Society.

The dogs have 24-hour daily companionship, sleeping in crates next to the offenders’ bunks. This constant attention pays off when correcting behaviors.

For example, Markswell the hound has a problem finding the correct place to relieve himself. His handler, Taylor Marean, has learned to notice his “suspicious sniffing.”
This allows Marean to get the dog to the appropriate place so Markswell can receive praise for a job well done.

Cloudy went back to the Humane Society. After several months, when he was still there, the staff at the Humane Society contacted OCC to see whether they could give him a break from his confines.

“Sometimes, OCC is like an overflow for the Humane Society,” Hanson said.
“We will get calls asking us to take a few off their hands.”

Bennett is quick to say that the Humane Society picks up the bill for the veterinary care and feed for the dogs housed at the prison.

One obligation the prison aims to fulfill for society is to release offenders who are able to be a useful part of their communities. The dog program helps instill this in offenders by giving them responsibility on many different levels.

“This program gives us a way to give back a little bit,” Marean said.

“We have had 138 dogs complete the program and 134 dogs adopted.”

To qualify, an offender must have absolutely no history of animal cruelty, violent or sexual offenses. Prospective handlers’ medical and mental health files are screened by trained staff. Handling dogs is a privilege that can be lost through violations by the handler.

Travis Boyer passed all of the requirements and was introduced to Cloudy.

The dog program has grown from being a few dogs in one housing unit to dogs currently residing in all three units. There may be 15 dogs and 30 handlers working the program at any given time.

“It seems like everybody wants to be a handler,” said handler Chris Hansford, hanging onto the leash of Buddy, a golden retriever.

Hanson and Price describe the offenders as “temporary guardians,” noting that the men take pride in the work they do. Sometimes, the men write open letters telling the future owner the dog’s particular likes and unique attributes they have noticed.

OCC staff notice changes in the units when dogs are introduced.


“There is a sense of calm. The tone in the unit changes instantly,” Hanson said.

The lines between different residents are broken down because, as offenders get to know the various dogs, they also come to know the different handlers.

“The dogs help us develop relationships with each other,” said Travis Jackson, the handler watching over Copper, a mini-pincer mix.

Victory for the dog and the program is adoption. Cloudy found a home, and Boyer is still helping dogs learn to be better citizens.

________

Zorina Barker lives in the Sol Duc Valley with her husband, a logger, and two children she home-schools.

Meowgaritas and Mutts Raises $75,000

Port Angeles, WA ( May 5, 2014) —  The Olympic Peninsula Humane Society’s second annual Meowgaritas and Mutts dinner and auction raised $75,000 to benefit the Humane Society’s capital campaign, “Dig Deep.”

The fiesta- themed event was held at the Vern Burton on Saturday, April 26. Nearly 400 people attended the dinner and auction, doubling the number of guests from last year.  Jose’s Famous Salsa provided the Mexican dinner.

“I am so pleased with the support we received from our community,” said Mary Beth Wegener, Executive Director of OPHS. “Meowgaritas and Mutts is a fun event and a wonderful way to raise funds for the animals in our care. We’re already planning for next year!”

The 2015 event will take place on Saturday, April 25th at the Vern Burton.

OPHS owns 9 acres on Old Olympic Highway between Port Angeles and Sequim. The three modular buildings currently on the property will be used to house cats, administration and veterinary services. However, a dog kennel facility must be built before the  organization can move to the new location. A capital campaign began last November and to date has raised $675,000 towards a goal of $1.12 million.

The Humane Society will break ground on the dog kennel facility late this summer or early fall with an anticipated completion date of late spring of 2015.

The Olympic Peninsula Humane Society has maintained an active presence in the community since 1947. The Society shelters and cares for animals of all types.  A private, non-profit  corporation, the Society is financed primarily by private donations and gifts. No animals are turned away and annually 2500-3000 animals pass through the doors of the facility. For more information or to volunteer, please call the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society at 360-457-8206.

 

Olympic Peninsula Humane Society Invites Community to “Dig Deep”

Port Angeles, WA ( March 16, 2014) — The Olympic Peninsula Humane Society is inviting the community to catch the vision for a new shelter by joining its “Dig Deep” capital campaign.

Since November , the Humane Society has raised nearly $600,000 of the $1.12 million needed for the project.

“We are so excited to have reached the halfway mark in our fundraising efforts, ” said Linda Crow, capital campaign chair. “We’ve been in the quiet phase of Dig Deep since November and we’ve had a wonderful response from donors who understand how important it is for the Humane Society to move to a new location that will be better for the animals and people of Clallam County.”

The land is located at 1743 Old Olympic Highway and includes 9.5 acres plus several buildings that will be used for sheltering animals, veterinary services and administrative space.  A dog kennel building must be built before the Humane Society can move its operations to the new location.  The new shelter complex will allow OPHS to expand its services and implement new programs to help pet owners.

OPHS paid off the land in 2013 and has been taking preliminary steps towards moving to the property since that time. Lindberg & Smith Architects designed the dog kennel building and will act as project managers. The goal is to use as many local contractors and suppliers as possible to help support the local economy.

The project will be entirely funded through private donations. No public money will be used.

“We are looking at breaking ground this summer, hopefully in June or July, depending on the permitting process and other variables like weather,” said Mary Beth Wegener, executive director of OPHS. “This  eight month project should put us in our new home in early 2015, something the staff and volunteers are very excited about.”

The Olympic Peninsula Humane Society has maintained an active presence in the community since 1947. The Society shelters and cares for animals of all types.  A private, non-profit corporation, the Society is financed primarily by private donations and gifts. No animals are turned away and annually approximately 2,000 animals pass through the doors of the facility. For more information or to volunteer, please call the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society at 360-457-8206.

 

98 Felines Find Homes After Port Angeles Shelter Waives Adoption Fee

From the January 7, 2014 Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Olympic Peninsula Humane Society found new homes for 98 cats and kittens for Christmas after the society waived the feline adoption fee for December.

The temporary fee waiver nearly doubled the Port Angeles-based shelter’s average monthly cat adoption rate of 50, shelter Director Mary Beth Wegener said.

“We [had] to figure out a way to move a lot of them out so our staff wasn’t drowning in cats and kittens.”

There are still 80 felines awaiting permanent homes, although the full fee will be required. In the final month of 2013, Wegener estimated that the shelter at 2105 W. U.S. Highway 101 west of Port Angeles had about 80 cats and slightly more than 100 kittens in its care.

“We needed to move them out of the shelter, and we wanted to try something new,” Wegener said. The shelter waived the normal $85-per-cat adoption fee, charging only $25 per animal for vaccinations and microchipping until Christmas. The $85 usually includes spaying or neutering and a free health check by a veterinarian, Wegener said, all of which was done for no extra cost for cats during December. “It was a pretty awesome deal,” she said.

In just the first two weeks of December, Wegener said the shelter found homes for 64 kittens and 18 adult cats.“This was the first time that we tried this, and it seemed to have struck a chord with the community because we did very well,” she said. The response to the promotion, which Wegener called the society’s most successful in her almost three years as executive director, seemed to come mostly from the society publicizing it on its Facebook page.

The shelter sent 15 adult cats to the Northwest Organization for Animal Help in Stanwood a few days ago. “It’s much more manageable now than it was in early December,” Wegener said. Wegener said winter is an unusual time for the shelter to run such a promotion since “kitten season” — when the society gets in the most kittens — typically runs from April to November. “Our kitten season started a little later this year and lasted a little longer,” she said.

Shelter staff and volunteers cannot be sure why more kittens than usual were brought in toward the end of 2013, Wegener said, though warmer temperatures last winter may have been a factor.“So they kind of never stopped breeding,” Wegener said. Litters of kittens brought to the shelter often come from Clallam County residents who have found them on their property and do not have the resources to take care of them, Wegener explained.

Similar population booms are not really seen in dogs, since they tend to reproduce more slowly and are let loose and left to their own devices less often than cats. “Dogs are kind of always your pet,” Wegener said, adding that the shelter currently has 20 dogs in its care.“Cats can be feral and can be free-roaming.” If needed, Wegener said, the earliest the shelter would hold another cat adoption promotion likely would be in the spring.

Shelter hours are from 11 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturdays. For more information, visit www.ophumanesociety.org ; or email info@ophumanesociety.org.

Olympic Peninsula Humane Society Pays off Land

Port Angeles, WA ( September 10, 2013) — The Olympic Peninsula Humane Society has paid off the land it purchased for $325,000 last year on Old Olympic Highway.

The land is located at 1743 Old Olympic Highway and includes 9.5 acres plus several buildings that can be used for administrative space and to shelter animals. A dog kennel building must be built before the humane society can move its operations to the new location.

“We are so grateful to our donors and supporters who made it possible for us to pay off the land in less than one year,” said Mary Beth Wegener, Executive Director of the shelter. “Our staff and volunteers are very excited about moving to the new location and providing a better environment for the animals in our care.”

The board of directors is in the planning stages for the new facility with a goal of moving to the property in late 2014 or early 2015.

The Olympic Peninsula Humane Society has maintained an active presence in the community since 1947. The Society shelters and cares for animals of all types.  A private, non-profit  corporation, the Society is financed primarily by private donations and gifts. No animals are turned away and annually approximately 2,000 animals pass through the doors of the facility. For more information or to volunteer, please call the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society at 360-457-8206.

 

Website Under Construction

Because we are modifying our website, a few of our features are unavailable at this time. If you would like to make a donation or license your pet, please call the shelter at (360) 457-8206. We apologize for the inconvenience.